fairy tale


Wednesday’s Webcomic: The Horror Comics of Emily Carroll

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Today’s selection is actually a collection of brief short stories by artist Emily Carroll. At times haunting, at times terrifying, Emily Carroll’s comics are always vibrantly colored to great and disturbing effect. The writing has the feel of a old campfire story, a cautionary folk tale passed down from generation to generation. Carroll also makes use of her webpage’s “Infinite Canvas” potential by positioning her images onscreen outside of the traditional comic format, taking the reader on twists and turns across the page. Some stories also have additional programming in the images, with some panels changing as you hover your mouse over them and some with links to the next portion of the story subtly hidden among them. I highly recommend pouring over every image in the comics section of her portfolio to find all of the hidden secrets. Be warned, it’s not something to do in a room with the lights off. Or alone in the house. And for the love of your sanity, don’t read them during a thunderstorm! My three favorites are below, but be sure to check out the others on her site!

His Face All Red

Perhaps the most infamous of Carroll’s comics, His Face All Red is a chilling tale of guilt and betrayal.

The Prince & the Sea

A romance of two different worlds, a tale of treachery and misunderstanding.

Anu-Anulan & Yir's Daughter

Lest you think Emily Carroll’s talents are limited to scaring you witless, here is a beautiful and romantic original fairy tale.


Wednesday’s Webcomic – Erstwhile

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If you’ve read original Grimm Fairy Tales you know that many of the endings are anything but happy, the justice tends to be biblical, and the logic tends to belong in Bedlam. Erstwhile is the beautifully drawn, true-to-the-source adaptation of the lesser-known Grimm fairy tales. The artists also don’t cut out any of the tragic bits, the bloody bits, or any of the downright weird bits. It’s a collaboration between three artists, who take advantage of the short story collection format to change up the art each time with different styles, color palettes  and techniques.

Death of the Little Hen

My favorite part about the comic (Other than Grimm in all its grisly glory) is the art styles which always suit the story being told. Since all three artists have other series, I imagine drawing the same style every day can get a little weary, and they want to flex their muscles a little . The colors change to suit the tone, from the sad cool blues of The Little Shroud to the deceptively cheerful warm earth tones in The Bird, the Mouse, and the Sausage.  The first volume has been printed with the aid of a kickstarter and has the first eight tales, as well as being printed in truly luscious full color.

A Tale with a Riddle

About the Authors

Gina Biggs is the ringleader of our merry band of storytellers, and is the author of the long running romance web comic Red String. Louisa Roy is the author of the fantasy comic Velharthis, which is currently undergoing a ground-up rebuild. Elle Skinner is the author of Missing Monday.