The only reason Keir Hansen really wants the ability to time travel is to be able to get to all the content the geek community creates in a single day. A web dork and hack pixel-pusher by day, all spare hours are devoted to absorbing film and television, reading and writing sci-fi, a smattering of gaming, unlicensed attempts at mixology, culinary adventures, and novice cat wrangling.
He was once accused of being a "Jack of all trades", but that sounded too much like actual work, and the accuser has since been sacked. His particular passions include Whovianism (classic and new), the complete works of Douglas Adams, and anyone who offers a free sample of wine and/or chocolate, even when unmarked white vans are involved. (It's okay. He can run really quickly.)

Podcasts: Gallifrey Public Radio

Episode 52: One Time At Drama Camp

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“All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.” The bard may have been making a rather sweeping analogy about the pattern of one’s journey through life, but for those who find themselves enamored with stagecraft, either from the audience or in the company itself, the famous quote from “As You Like It” rings a little more true. Whether you come from the performance side, the live audience, the pre-recorded side, any view of the stage you choose, those of us who proudly consider ourselves “theater geeks” have a very unique community to thrive in. Drama? Sure. Suspense? Whenever needed. Fascination? Unquestionably. But how can we possibly explain these deep-rooted emotional connections with the uninitiated, or even worse, uninterested? Should we just wall ourselves off (mind that fourth wall, of course) and keep it to ourselves, or are there means to extend beyond? This session, we’re looking at the topic of theater geeks, that infatuation with live (or broadcast) stage entertainment. Joining us for the discussion are two unabashed fans of stage productions, Joy Piedmont (of the Reality Bomb podcast) and Robyn Jordan (of Black Girls Create and the #WizardTeam podcast)! * IMPORTANT NOTE: * As you’ll hear in this episode, this marks Alyssa’s last conversation with IDO for the near future, as she is taking on a highly time-intensive (and wholly incredible) new career pursuit. We wish her the absolute best in everything she invests her time and energy in, and look forward to having her back in the studio down the road, with so many stories to tell!


Ep. 51: The 2018 Geek Glad Game

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If we were to take some of the best things our respective fandoms have given us this year to date, wrap them lovingly in fancy paper, add a few ribbons and bows for detail, possibly place them under a tree or on a candle-lit table, chase away the cat who inevitably will attempt to eat said ribbon, and invite friends to accept them as gifts to be opened and enjoyed as we first did, you’d have the spirit of what we’re looking to do today. You may hear a lot of items we’ve shared in our “good news” segments from previous episodes this year, or even things that have come up in our main topic conversations with previous guests. Knowing us as you do by now, you may also be able to predict a number of things we have on our lists, and that’s okay! That just means we’re excited about them and thankful for them, and hope you feel the same. You may, however, hear of some things you’d missed in the flurry of activity and social media blur, and that’s even better. Our biggest hope is that you find something new to enjoy, and maybe even a new fandom to add to your roster. Joining us for the “game” this year is staff editor for and contributing writer to Den of Geek, Kayti Burt! (The full roster of mentioned ‘glad’ items is coming shortly, but listen for them first!)


Ep. 50: Living On Laughter

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When the world around you feels like a burning trashbag, there are many — many — of us who seek the temporary refuge of laughter. We rely on comedy and humor to brighten our days, distract our conscious minds, perhaps bond with others, and even release some valuable endorphins into our systems that help with the mental and physical healing processes. (It’s true!) Knowing this, the role of the comedian, the humorist, the satirist, is that much more important to our society. But is this a viable occupation in that society? How does one actually make the decision to bring laughter to others as a profession, and then seek out and test the medium in which to explore it? From the comedy stage, to the pages and sites of humor and satire magazines, to the writer’s rooms of television, film, and online studios, there are thousands among us who not only enjoy the good joke, but enjoy its creation. Joined by stand-up comedian and writer Riley Silverman, we look at what is means to make a career out of comedy, and how one can retain their sanity in the pursuit. (…Maybe.)


Episode 49: Cartoons for Big Kids

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We may be a single generation away from effective use of the term “Saturday Morning Cartoons”, as the accessibility of streaming services and on-demand entertainment brings any number of options to audiences at any time, on any day. But for adults viewing audiences right now, there are animated programs that occupy double-digit percentages of both broadcast and online programming libraries. Some of these are, without question, geared specifically to a mature audience. But many are created and written for younger audiences, while still drawing substantial numbers adult viewers. We’re geeks by definition, and to us, that means a deep-felt and detailed appreciation of things that we find entertaining, interesting, and engaging. So it should come as no surprise that many of us — a huge swath of us — are drawn to cartoons, regardless of the target demographic. Perhaps it’s the nostalgia, the opportunity to escape a demanding and stressful adult world to enjoy the simpler entertainment of our past. Perhaps it’s the original programs and series being created today, that capture that youthful energy, while still providing quality storytelling and content that either refuses to be maturity-labeled, or transcends those stiations to offer entertainment that is just as engaging and appealing to adults as it is to teens or even younger children. A good story, after all, is a good story… Joined by guests Chip (of This Week in Time Travel) and Lauren (voiceover artist and podcaster), we look at the topic of cartoons — specifically, enjoying them as an adult even if they are produced and targeted primarily to a younger audience.


Episode 48: Tearing Off the Gates

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If you have listened to even ten minutes of the two of us talking over the past couple years, you will recognize our commitment to allowing anyone and everyone to find the activities, content, and art forms that interest them, and feel free to immerse themselves in that interest in whatever fashion and to whatever degree makes them happy. For some, that is casual enjoyment of a film franchise — we had an episode on casual fandoms. For others, it’s fan fiction and conversation about non-canonical relationships among fictional characters. We’ve had conversations about that as well. We’ve discussed fanatic appreciations of television, film, music, sports, politics, even social activism. We do this for one important reason: because when you understand someone’s interests better, you can hopefully see why those interests exist, even if you don’t share them in the same way, or to the same degree. The fact that it makes them happy, with no harm to others, is the point. Love what you love. We try, and most often succeed, in being positive people. We revel in seeing others get excited about an upcoming release, or watching someone discovers a new passion. We may not share that passion. We may not be as interested in something coming to market. But we love that others do. What we cannot abide, however, is gatekeeping. This disgusting behavior never seems to die out, and perhaps it’s because of the immediacy of Internet response, or the growing public awareness of these acts of intolerance and exclusion, but with the recent news story of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” actor Kelly Marie Tran being effectively run off social media by hateful comments by so-called fans who attacked her for what they perceived as ‘ruining their fandom’, we’d had enough. This time, In Defense Of is going on the offensive. Joined by Joy Piedmont of Reality Bomb, and Don Klees of Acorn Media, we’re asking everyone to tear the gates off.


Episode 47: Prayers For the Dying (Saving Cancelled Shows)

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We never want to see a good tale come to an end, though we know that even “The Neverending Story” had to roll credits at some point. We live in a time when sequels, prequels, and extended universe content is more the norm than the novelty, and with our television programming, countless networks and distribution sources, we expect hit programs to get a long, healthy run, and for creators and showrunners to be able to share their ideas in full, to a logical and natural conclusion that leaves viewers satisfied. Life, however, runs on a very different set of production notes. Every viewer, every fan who has ever gotten invested in a television series likely knows the pain felt when word comes that the host network has decided to cancel a show before it reaches a narrative conclusion they are happy with. In many cases, the dedication to the program is such that no conclusion exists where they would be happy — they’d prefer to see the actors suspended from aging, and live out their roles forever. But the fact remains that executive decisions (and at times, extenuating circumstances) come about that halt fan-loved series too soon. Sometimes they are given the remainder of their season to complete the narrative. Sometimes, the axe falls faster. What is a fan to do? Podcast host Josh Liston of On the Bubble joins us to discuss how fans react, and even rally to save programs slated for cancellation.


The Snitch Had It Coming (Quidditch)

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You may pride yourself on your own personal Potterphilia, and you may be an aspiring athlete in a physically challenging, fast-paced field sport like soccer (sorry, football), field hockey, or rugby. But what about where those worlds merge? Enter Quidditch. Initially popularized on university campuses in the United Kingdom and United States in the mid-2000s, it has grown dramatically in structure, engagement, and recognition over the past decade. That being said, however, mention the actual sport to any number of workplace or community muggles, and you may get a blank stare. If this isn’t the perfect grounds for an IDO intervention, we don’t know what is. We were fortunate enough to be recently joined on a Skype call with someone who not only has a great insight on the structure and logistics of Quidditch games, leagues, and seasons, but has a vested interest in seeing the sport’s popularity continue to grow: Jack Lennard is the founder and director of the Quidditch Premier League, and was kind enough to talk with us about the sport, the league, and the players’ passion!


Episode 45: Food Fandom

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At a point in nearly everyone’s life, the point arrives where we are called upon to provide our own sustenance. Adulting! For some, this is daunting, daresay terrifying, and the task of preparing nutritious or even barely edible foods become a task, a chore, something to avoid when possible. Others, however, relish the challenge of a recipe, or go even further to blaze their own culinary trails, learning the artistry and alchemy of preparation, combination, presentation. Hail to thee, kitchen nerds — for you have our hearts, and our bellies. This session, we’re setting the table for a conversation about fan-caliber fascination with food and cooking. It might emerge from the love of family cooking history that evolves with the newest generation, or a a true geek’s immersion in trying new and innovative cooking technology. It could be a fanatical following of a famed chef or culinary personality, and exploration of the dishes, recipes, and styles they center upon. Whatever the flavor of fandom, when there’s this much passion in the mixture, you have to appreciate the results. We’re joined in studio by television editor, podcaster, and master-of-his-own-kitchen, Wil Hendandez, to discuss this fanatical fascination with food. Editor’s Note: For those interested in the #WhoAgainstGuns initiative mentioned during our “good news from the fandoms” segment, please visit the fundraiser site for details on how to get involved. We implore you to do so, and help spread the word about this campaign to combat gun violence!


Episode 44: When Harold Met Spolin (Improv Comedy)

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Whether you first heard of the idea of “improv” from a studio that went up in your hometown, from a rather recognizable televised comedy game that saw popularity in the last ten or fifteen years, or possibly even from conversations with performing arts majors on college campuses, most people will have some understanding of what improvisation means. The form has grown in recognition and application in the last 25 years, but dates back as far as some early 20th century vaudeville shows, or even the Commedia dell’Arte of 18th century Italy. Referring to it as “improv acting” may be a misnomer, however, as in many modern instances, there may not even be ‘acting’ involved. Improv skills and their approaches to interpersonal communication have found new applications in team building exercises, speech and behavioral therapy, both elementary and adult education. Of course, there is still the obvious association with quick thinking, listening skills, speaking in public, and everything else you might look to develop in order to “say yes” to any offers you’re presented with. And yes, despite the fact that it appears so off-the-cuff, there’s actually a rather sophisticated structure to improv. We’re joined for the conversation by Julie and Matt, players from the Hartford, Connecticut-based Sea Tea Improv, as well as other improv comedy groups from around the country!


Episode 43: The Geek Glad Game 2017

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We survived 2016 by the skin of our teeth, and the struggles that year put us through were the flames in which the ‘Geek Glad Game’ was forged. We are optimists and positivists, and found a long list of things that fans of all topics and subjects could revel in, from books to television, film to music, community efforts and random charitable acts. So here we are at the close of 2017, and while opinions vary on how this year has compared to its predecessor in many ways, one thing is for certain: it has still been a great year for geeks. Joining us for the discussion is the host of the Terminus Podcast, friend and genuinely ultra-positive person, Nicole Mazza!