The only reason Keir Hansen really wants the ability to time travel is to be able to get to all the content the geek community creates in a single day. A web dork and hack pixel-pusher by day, all spare hours are devoted to absorbing film and television, reading and writing sci-fi, a smattering of gaming, unlicensed attempts at mixology, culinary adventures, and novice cat wrangling.
He was once accused of being a "Jack of all trades", but that sounded too much like actual work, and the accuser has since been sacked. His particular passions include Whovianism (classic and new), the complete works of Douglas Adams, and anyone who offers a free sample of wine and/or chocolate, even when unmarked white vans are involved. (It's okay. He can run really quickly.)

Podcasts: Gallifrey Public Radio

Episode 48: Tearing Off the Gates

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If you have listened to even ten minutes of the two of us talking over the past couple years, you will recognize our commitment to allowing anyone and everyone to find the activities, content, and art forms that interest them, and feel free to immerse themselves in that interest in whatever fashion and to whatever degree makes them happy. For some, that is casual enjoyment of a film franchise — we had an episode on casual fandoms. For others, it’s fan fiction and conversation about non-canonical relationships among fictional characters. We’ve had conversations about that as well. We’ve discussed fanatic appreciations of television, film, music, sports, politics, even social activism. We do this for one important reason: because when you understand someone’s interests better, you can hopefully see why those interests exist, even if you don’t share them in the same way, or to the same degree. The fact that it makes them happy, with no harm to others, is the point. Love what you love. We try, and most often succeed, in being positive people. We revel in seeing others get excited about an upcoming release, or watching someone discovers a new passion. We may not share that passion. We may not be as interested in something coming to market. But we love that others do. What we cannot abide, however, is gatekeeping. This disgusting behavior never seems to die out, and perhaps it’s because of the immediacy of Internet response, or the growing public awareness of these acts of intolerance and exclusion, but with the recent news story of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” actor Kelly Marie Tran being effectively run off social media by hateful comments by so-called fans who attacked her for what they perceived as ‘ruining their fandom’, we’d had enough. This time, In Defense Of is going on the offensive. Joined by Joy Piedmont of Reality Bomb, and Don Klees of Acorn Media, we’re asking everyone to tear the gates off.


Episode 47: Prayers For the Dying (Saving Cancelled Shows)

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We never want to see a good tale come to an end, though we know that even “The Neverending Story” had to roll credits at some point. We live in a time when sequels, prequels, and extended universe content is more the norm than the novelty, and with our television programming, countless networks and distribution sources, we expect hit programs to get a long, healthy run, and for creators and showrunners to be able to share their ideas in full, to a logical and natural conclusion that leaves viewers satisfied. Life, however, runs on a very different set of production notes. Every viewer, every fan who has ever gotten invested in a television series likely knows the pain felt when word comes that the host network has decided to cancel a show before it reaches a narrative conclusion they are happy with. In many cases, the dedication to the program is such that no conclusion exists where they would be happy — they’d prefer to see the actors suspended from aging, and live out their roles forever. But the fact remains that executive decisions (and at times, extenuating circumstances) come about that halt fan-loved series too soon. Sometimes they are given the remainder of their season to complete the narrative. Sometimes, the axe falls faster. What is a fan to do? Podcast host Josh Liston of On the Bubble joins us to discuss how fans react, and even rally to save programs slated for cancellation.


The Snitch Had It Coming (Quidditch)

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You may pride yourself on your own personal Potterphilia, and you may be an aspiring athlete in a physically challenging, fast-paced field sport like soccer (sorry, football), field hockey, or rugby. But what about where those worlds merge? Enter Quidditch. Initially popularized on university campuses in the United Kingdom and United States in the mid-2000s, it has grown dramatically in structure, engagement, and recognition over the past decade. That being said, however, mention the actual sport to any number of workplace or community muggles, and you may get a blank stare. If this isn’t the perfect grounds for an IDO intervention, we don’t know what is. We were fortunate enough to be recently joined on a Skype call with someone who not only has a great insight on the structure and logistics of Quidditch games, leagues, and seasons, but has a vested interest in seeing the sport’s popularity continue to grow: Jack Lennard is the founder and director of the Quidditch Premier League, and was kind enough to talk with us about the sport, the league, and the players’ passion!


Episode 45: Food Fandom

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At a point in nearly everyone’s life, the point arrives where we are called upon to provide our own sustenance. Adulting! For some, this is daunting, daresay terrifying, and the task of preparing nutritious or even barely edible foods become a task, a chore, something to avoid when possible. Others, however, relish the challenge of a recipe, or go even further to blaze their own culinary trails, learning the artistry and alchemy of preparation, combination, presentation. Hail to thee, kitchen nerds — for you have our hearts, and our bellies. This session, we’re setting the table for a conversation about fan-caliber fascination with food and cooking. It might emerge from the love of family cooking history that evolves with the newest generation, or a a true geek’s immersion in trying new and innovative cooking technology. It could be a fanatical following of a famed chef or culinary personality, and exploration of the dishes, recipes, and styles they center upon. Whatever the flavor of fandom, when there’s this much passion in the mixture, you have to appreciate the results. We’re joined in studio by television editor, podcaster, and master-of-his-own-kitchen, Wil Hendandez, to discuss this fanatical fascination with food. Editor’s Note: For those interested in the #WhoAgainstGuns initiative mentioned during our “good news from the fandoms” segment, please visit the fundraiser site for details on how to get involved. We implore you to do so, and help spread the word about this campaign to combat gun violence!


Episode 44: When Harold Met Spolin (Improv Comedy)

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Whether you first heard of the idea of “improv” from a studio that went up in your hometown, from a rather recognizable televised comedy game that saw popularity in the last ten or fifteen years, or possibly even from conversations with performing arts majors on college campuses, most people will have some understanding of what improvisation means. The form has grown in recognition and application in the last 25 years, but dates back as far as some early 20th century vaudeville shows, or even the Commedia dell’Arte of 18th century Italy. Referring to it as “improv acting” may be a misnomer, however, as in many modern instances, there may not even be ‘acting’ involved. Improv skills and their approaches to interpersonal communication have found new applications in team building exercises, speech and behavioral therapy, both elementary and adult education. Of course, there is still the obvious association with quick thinking, listening skills, speaking in public, and everything else you might look to develop in order to “say yes” to any offers you’re presented with. And yes, despite the fact that it appears so off-the-cuff, there’s actually a rather sophisticated structure to improv. We’re joined for the conversation by Julie and Matt, players from the Hartford, Connecticut-based Sea Tea Improv, as well as other improv comedy groups from around the country!


Episode 43: The Geek Glad Game 2017

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We survived 2016 by the skin of our teeth, and the struggles that year put us through were the flames in which the ‘Geek Glad Game’ was forged. We are optimists and positivists, and found a long list of things that fans of all topics and subjects could revel in, from books to television, film to music, community efforts and random charitable acts. So here we are at the close of 2017, and while opinions vary on how this year has compared to its predecessor in many ways, one thing is for certain: it has still been a great year for geeks. Joining us for the discussion is the host of the Terminus Podcast, friend and genuinely ultra-positive person, Nicole Mazza!


Episode 42: Verily and Merrily

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If you met someone who expressed a high interest in the culture, language, civil structure, and societal behaviors of a historical period, say, the 16th century in northwestern Europe, you might identify them as a Elizabethan of Jacobean historian. If someone else spent weeks on end portraying a historical role, actual or fictional, you’d likely guess they were an actor by profession. If someone combined these passions and fueled them with a boundless energy, a willingness to accept self-inflicted physical discomfort, a desire to learn obscure or even dangerous hobbies, and a penchant for equal parts highbrow and low-brow humor, well — you’ve got yourself a renaissance faire performer. The origins of renaissance faires and festivals can trace back to the late 1950s, but it wasn’t until the mid 1960s and early 70s that the idea of a weekend-long historical immersion enterprises began to appear in the United States. These interactive attractions combined music, dance, and theatrical performance with demonstrations of archery, riding, combat, artistry, crafting, and even smithing. Faire-goers came to expect an experience where the staff (or cast, or company, the labels may vary) remains “in character” at all times, adding to the sense of realism. These are commercial endeavors, to be accurate, but something about the nature of comradery and desire to create a complex and intricate illusion for the patron makes “faire-folk” a very special breed. We’d like to find out what makes renaissance faires as popular now as they’ve ever been in a 40-plus year legacy, and in addition to the constant stream of patrons, what draws talent in from long distances to be a part of this most unique production. To help make that happen, we sat down for a raucous conversation with Kelly and Don Kilcoyne, two of the principal writers, directors, choreographers, marketers, oh — and cast members — of the 40-year running New York Renaissance Faire in Tuxedo, New York.


Episode 41: What, Like the Radio?

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There are (at present) 16 head categories and 56 subcategories recognized by the Apple iTunes podcast directory, and similar numbers for Google Play’s library. Within them, there are virtually hundreds of thousands of podcasts to explore and listen to, nearly 30% of which continue to publish new content on a monthly or even weekly basis. We don’t want to bog everything down with the math, here, but assuming each cast varies in length from 25-minute explanations of recent behavioral research studies (see NPR’s “Hidden Brain”), to hour-plus analyses of each individual minute of a single film (such as the “Back to the Future Minute”), you could safely estimate that at any given hour, there is more audio content than can be listened to in an entire year. It takes a very special sort of person — some may say, a special flavor of crazy — who chooses not only to enter this sea of sound as a listener, but as a creator and contributor. Well, challenge accepted! Today, joined by fellow podcaster Haley Malle (of Gallifrey Public Radio, Legends of SHIELD, and numerous other Gonna Geek podcasts), we’re looking at the idea of podcasting as an activity, perhaps hobby, perhaps profession, and the rise of this form of distributing entertainment, news, and information over the past ten years that has earned the buzz phrase of “disruptive technology”, now rivaling broadcast and satellite radio in more demographics and regions of the world as you may imagine. Sure, you can still enjoy a good oldey-timey radio show, complete with sound foley, musical interludes, and even commercial product endorsement, but the actual radio itself is now not only optional, it teeters on obsolete.


Episode 40: Print Positive

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Whether you identify with Hermione, delving into the racks and dusty back corridors of the Hogwarts library to find the perfect tome, or Sam Tarley, sneaking into the Citadel archives to seek the ancient texts that may save Westeros, or perhaps Willow in the Sunnydale High School library, poring over stacks of historical and theological references to find the information needed to keep her friends and town safe, there’s something in in nearly every pop culture franchise of the past two decades that involves a lover of books. Doesn’t this conflict with the increasing ubiquity of digital media and electronic communication? Haven’t we sold enough Kindles, Nooks, and iPads to turn the tides of publication, and go truly paperless? Does anyone seriously want to hold a physical book in their hands anymore? (You probably know where we’re going with this.) Despite the sales of electronic reading devices, the exponential surge in both independent blogs and commercialized Internet journalism, and the exhausting media hype about “those darned device-dependant millennials”, the printed book still has a firm foundation in our culture, and in our consumption. We want to spend some time looking at the dogged persistence of print, and what still gives us that unique pleasure in holding a tangible literary object in our hands, the act of turning the pages, and the satisfaction of closing the back cover after finishing the tale. This week, we’re joined once again by fellow bibliophile Joy Piedmont, to discuss the enduring love of the physical, printed book. Referenced Text: The HPA Fandom Forward on Doctor Who, with extensive citation from our own Alyssa!


Episode 39: Space For Everyone

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Some initial facts to chew on: population distribution by ethnicity puts caucasians at roughly 60% in the United States, and below 33% globally, according to census data and CIA factbooks between 2010 and the present. That means that by ethnic identification, 40% of Americans and 66% of the world recognizes itself as non-white. Now go to the movie theater, video game shop, comic book rack, or convention center, and see if the math holds true. Something feel a little out of joint? There have been great strides made in the wide scope of science fiction over the last 50 years with regard to incorporating people of color. Often in step with historic advances in civil rights, political awareness, and a more vocal and interactive global community, the entertainment industry has likewise moved forward to present stories and characters that better represent the diversity of the human race — both present day, and in the future. So how far have we really come? Who has led, and is still leading, the efforts to progress further towards true representation of all ethnicities in science fiction? And how far are we from where we ought to be? Joined by writer Tai Gooden, we look at the past, present, and future of diversity in science fiction through all media.